The next generation of Sunny Boy – the 5.0-US/6.0-US

This post was originally published in 2016. The tips and techniques explained may be outdated.

SMA’s iconic line of Sunny Boy inverters has undergone a complete redesign of its popular models with Secure Power Supply. Ready to once again take over the North American residential PV market, the UL-listed Sunny Boy 5.0-US/6.0-US offers an increasingly robust feature set, allowing for reduced costs across all business operations and backed by the industry’s top-ranked service team.

The next generation Sunny Boy expands on its predecessor’s optimal design flexibility through multiple independent power point tracking channels, each featuring SMA’s proprietary OptiTrac Global Peak shade mitigation technology.

All-inclusive technology

SMA’s popular Secure Power Supply now provides up to 2,000 watts of opportunity power, allowing operation of larger electrical loads like small refrigerators and space heaters and affording even more value to homeowners in the event of a daytime grid outage.

The latest Sunny Boy boasts an integrated Webserver and WLAN for direct, wireless interface with a smartphone, tablet or laptop computer. This communication platform provides state-of-the-art monitoring via Sunny Portal for system management and is compatible with SMA’s Installation Assistant to greatly reduce labor and commissioning time in the field.

The All-New Sunny Boy-US

Adding to the feature set is an integrated DC disconnect that reduces the costs associated with equipment stocking and order processing while speeding installation. The Sunny Boy 5.0-US/6.0-US also features a two-part enclosure concept for expedited servicing.

Coming soon

The Sunny Boy 5.0-US/6.0-US will be available for delivery in early 2016 through SMA’s North American distribution network. To locate an SMA Authorized Distributor, visit our Where to Buy page to learn more about each distribution partner.

SMA also plans to release additional powers classes, including the Sunny Boy 7.0/8.0-US later in 2016. Want to see more videos on the Sunny Boy 5.0-US/6.0-US? Watch our Tech Tips on commissioning the latest Sunny Boy and installing Secure Power Supply.

16 Comments
  1. Tim
    Tim says:

    Justin, What will the list price be for the 5.0 and 6.0? Will the Quick Design Reference Tool software get me close in estimating the string options for the 5.0 and 6.0 if I use a similar sized TLUS-22 inverters? Thanks.

    Reply
  2. William
    William says:

    The lower cost of the unit and increased wattage rating for the SPS are very nice!

    Is there any way to synchronize/combine the output of two SPS from two paralleled SB 5.0/6.0 inverters? (to achieve 4,000W grid-down backup power instead of two separate 2,000W outlets)

    I am planning a 10,000W panel system that would feed two SB 5.0 units. Having 4,000W of opportunity power would be better than 2 x 2,000W outlets.

    Thank you,
    William

    Reply
  3. Giancarlo
    Giancarlo says:

    Is it posssible to connect a SB-6.0-US to a three-phase Delta-Wye-G 25KVA transformer of my property. with the objetive to sync the PV power plant to the grid, what are the risk to the transformer or to the loads (near 6Kwh) and the inverter. This is because it less cost-effective to use tri-power inverter because the minimum specifications of these. The exceded of inyected power to the grid reach 1Kwh.

    Reply
  4. Eric G
    Eric G says:

    What are the main diferences between the Tl inverters and the 6.0 concerning the SPS?

    I install the 6.0 inverters now and I’m not familiar with the wiring for the sps.

    Any response would be very helpful before I open the booklet.

    Reply
  5. Robert Loveridge
    Robert Loveridge says:

    Does the new Sunny Boy 5/6 inverters allow individual panel level monitoring and optimizations or only panel clusters? I know some systems do, but does yours?

    Thank you.

    Reply
  6. Eric Cantrell
    Eric Cantrell says:

    We just had our Sunny Boy 5.0 installed a few months ago and had Hurricane Irma pass over us yesterday. We are now without power because the grid is down. I understand the 5.0 has an SPS function, but that wasn’t installed initially. Do I need to call back the original installer to add this or can a regular electrician do it! Does it require an additional permit to make this change?

    Reply

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